The International Panorama Council Journal, Volume 3 is now available

I am pleased to announce the publication of the International Panorama Council Journal, Volume 3. The International Panorama Council is committed to the history and preservation of the panorama and its relevance to the broader context of the media arts. The mission of the IPC journal is to stimulate and foster worldwide interdisciplinary research on the panorama and its related forms. My paper entitled, “Sacred Spaces of New England: Artistic Research, Cultural Heritage, and Virtual Reality Panoramic Photography” is included in this volume. Please click here to read more about IPC’s journal and to download a free copy.

I was also recently interviewed about this article and the Sacred Spaces of New England project for an episode of the Versatilist, a podcast dedicated to sharing and exploring the nature of immersive learning. The interview can be found at https://bit.ly/36eANd2.

Below is the description of the episode:

In this episode, I speak with Seth Thompson, the author of “Sacred Spaces of New England: Artistic Research, Cultural Heritage, and Virtual Reality Panoramic Photography.” We had a great conversation about New England, even though neither of us live there anymore. For more information about his work, check out https://seththompson.info/sacredspacesne/.

International Panorama Council Journal, Volume 3’s Cover

It’s a Jungle Out There with this Google Street View Mod

Street View of My Home Using Urban Jungle Street View


Street View of My Home Using Urban Jungle Street View

Reminiscent of Thomas Cole’s painting, The Course of Empire: Desolation (1836), Sweden-based developer Einar Öberg has created a very clever Google Street View modification entitled, Urban Jungle Street View. However, the sombre apocalyptic tone of Cole’s painting is replaced with amusement and mayhem in the case of Öberg’s quirky project, as it allows you to select anyplace available in Street View and see it in his jungle mode.

Öberg states on his website, “This experiment [is] using an undocumented part of Street View, the depth data. With that a depth map and a normal map is generated, which can be used in the shaders and to plot geometry and sprites in (almost) the correct position in 3d space.”

It should be noted that Öberg warns on Twitter that he is “Breaking [Google’s] terms of use like it’s no tomorrow”, so check out your home or favorite place at: http://inear.se/urbanjungle/ before it possibly comes down. Intentional or not, this is a definite piece of Internet-based art.

Thomas Cole, The Course of Empire: Desolation, 1836


Thomas Cole, The Course of Empire: Desolation (1836)

The Adobe Museum of Digital Media fails to embrace its own media potential

 

Adobe Museum of Digital Media

 

On October 6, 2010, two months after its anticipated release, Adobe launched the Adobe Museum of Digital Media, an online exhibition space for art and design. While providing enticing architectural graphics, the site is disappointing because it does not embrace current museum and Web 2.0 thought on developing participatory experiences to create dialogue and engage community. As a result, the Adobe Museum of Digital Media fails to grasp the potential of the Web by using a traditional authoritative exhibition model within a digital environment. Besides decreasing the download time to experience the museum interface and work at hand, my advice to Adobe is to let go of the notion of a physical architecture within the interface design and provide a more visceral experience for viewers to engage in and interact with intangible works of art that are made specifically for the screen.

Read the Adobe Museum of Digital Media press release.

Originally posted on November 18, 2010