New Cardboard App Release: First Presbyterian Church VR

First Presbyterian Church VR is a Google Cardboard app presenting the sanctuary of the First Presbyterian Church in Stamford, Connecticut. A recording of the musical composition, “Coventry Carol” performed by the New York Symphonic Brass with James D. Wetherald on organ accompanies this 360-degree immersive experience.

Founded in 1854, the First Presbyterian Church commissioned noted architect Wallace K. Harrison in 1953 to design its present structure. Harrison was both a contributing architect and coordinator of such major public buildings as the United Nations, Rockefeller Center and Lincoln Center. The structure, which was completed in 1958, is thought to be one of the finest examples of religious modern architecture along with those designed by Le Corbusier, Philip Johnson and Frank Lloyd Wright. Its reinforced concrete and stained glass walls are formed from more than 20,000 individual chunks of inch-thick glass – a stained glass technique called “dalle de verre.” The stained glass design on the right side of the church’s sanctuary suggests the story of the crucifixion and on the left, the story of the resurrection. The stained glass in the narthex or rear of the church displays symbols of communion and peace. Although not intentional, the church’s sanctuary has been likened to the form of a fish in both profile and floor plan – a symbol used in early Christianity.

For those who are new to Google Cardboard, it is a virtual reality platform that uses a relatively low-cost cardboard or plastic viewer in conjunction with a mobile phone device to create an immersive experience.

This app works with Google Cardboard and most Android mobile phone devices. To download the app, go to: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=info.seththompson.FirstPresbyterianChurchVR

For more information about the Sacred Spaces of New England project, please visit: http://sacredspacesofnewengland.seththompson.info.

Panorama of the Nave at Saint Spyridon Greek Orthodox Cathedral in Worcester, Massachusetts

Saint Spyridon Greek Orthodox Cathedral in Worcester, Massachusetts is a new addition to the Sacred Spaces of New England project. Established in 1914, Saint Spyridon Greek Orthodox Cathedral is a center for spiritual worship to over 6,000 people in the Worcester area.

If you would like to learn more about the church, please visit the Saint Spyridon Greek Orthodox Cathedral’s entry on the Sacred Spaces of New England website.

Panorama of the Meeting Room at the Saylesville Meetinghouse in Lincoln, Rhode Island

The Saylesville Meetinghouse in Lincoln, Rhode Island is a new addition to the Sacred Spaces of New England project. Built in 1704 and expanded in 1745, the Saylesville Meetinghouse has been in continuous use as a gathering place for the Quakers for over 300 years.

If you would like to learn more about the meetinghouse, please visit the Saylesville Meetinghouse’s entry on the Sacred Spaces of New England website.

Panorama of the Nave at St. Catherine Greek Orthodox Church in Braintree, Massachusetts

St. Catherine Greek Orthodox Church in Braintree, Massachusetts is a new addition to the Sacred Spaces of New England project. Officially formed on October 23, 1960, St. Catherine Greek Orthodox Church grew out of a need to serve the growing Greek Orthodox population in the southern and western parts of Boston.

If you would like to learn more about the church, please visit the St. Catherine Greek Orthodox Church’s entry on the Sacred Spaces of New England website.

Panorama of the Sanctuary at Trinity United Methodist Church in Springfield, Massachusetts

Trinity United Methodist Church in Springfield, Massachusetts is a new addition to the Sacred Spaces of New England project. With roots dating back to 1791, Trinity United Methodist Church considers itself a “Community Cathedral” dedicated to worship, learning and recreation.

If you would like to learn more about the church, please visit the Trinity United Methodist Church’s entry on the Sacred Spaces of New England website.

Panorama of the Meeting Room at Providence Friends Meeting in Providence, Rhode Island

Providence Friends Meeting in Providence, Rhode Island is a new addition to the Sacred Spaces of New England project. While Quakers do not believe that meeting for worship necessarily requires a special place, Providence Monthly Meeting was established in 1718 and due to the growth of the Quaker community in the area, a meeting house was established. Its current building, completed in 1953, reflects the philosophy of a Quaker Meeting House with its absence of liturgical symbols and simplicity of design.

If you would like to learn more about the meeting house, please visit the Providence Meeting’s entry on the Sacred Spaces of New England website.

Panorama of the Nave at Saint George Cathedral in Boston, Massachusetts

Saint George Cathedral in Boston, Massachusetts is a new addition to the Sacred Spaces of New England project. Organized in 1908, Saint George Cathedral is the first Albanian Orthodox Church in the United States and the largest Orthodox Christian house of worship in the state of Massachusetts.

If you would like to learn more about the church, please visit the Saint George Cathedral’s entry on the Sacred Spaces of New England website.

Panorama of the Prayer Hall at the Islamic Society of Boston Cultural Center in Roxbury, Massachusetts

The Islamic Society of Boston Cultural Center in Roxbury, Massachusetts is a new addition to the Sacred Spaces of New England project. Founded in 2009, the Islamic Society of Boston Cultural Center is a mosque and community center located in the heart of Roxbury.

If you would like to learn more about this mosque and cultural center, please visit the Islamic Society of Boston Cultural Center entry on the Sacred Spaces of New England website.

Panorama of the Sanctuary at Cathedral Church of St. Luke, Portland, Maine

The Cathedral Church of St. Luke in Portland, Maine is a new addition to the Sacred Spaces of New England project. Formed in 1851, the Cathedral Church of St. Luke was chosen to be the cathedral church for the Episcopal Diocese of Maine in 1866. Its current structure, built in the Gothic Revival style, was designed by Charles Coolidge Haight and completed in 1868.

If you would like to learn more about the church, please visit the Cathedral Church of St. Luke’s entry on the Sacred Spaces of New England website.

Panorama of the Sanctuary at Cathedral of Saint Paul, Worcester, Massachusetts

The Cathedral of Saint Paul of Worcester, Massachusetts is a new addition to my Sacred Spaces of New England project. Founded in 1869, the Cathedral of Saint Paul has served as the mother church of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Worcester since 1950, when the Diocese was established in the city.

If you would like to learn more about the church, please visit the Cathedral of Saint Paul’s entry on the Sacred Spaces of New England website.