The International Panorama Council Journal, Volume 3 is now available

I am pleased to announce the publication of the International Panorama Council Journal, Volume 3. The International Panorama Council is committed to the history and preservation of the panorama and its relevance to the broader context of the media arts. The mission of the IPC journal is to stimulate and foster worldwide interdisciplinary research on the panorama and its related forms. My paper entitled, “Sacred Spaces of New England: Artistic Research, Cultural Heritage, and Virtual Reality Panoramic Photography” is included in this volume. Please click here to read more about IPC’s journal and to download a free copy.

I was also recently interviewed about this article and the Sacred Spaces of New England project for an episode of the Versatilist, a podcast dedicated to sharing and exploring the nature of immersive learning. The interview can be found at https://bit.ly/36eANd2.

Below is the description of the episode:

In this episode, I speak with Seth Thompson, the author of “Sacred Spaces of New England: Artistic Research, Cultural Heritage, and Virtual Reality Panoramic Photography.” We had a great conversation about New England, even though neither of us live there anymore. For more information about his work, check out https://seththompson.info/sacredspacesne/.

International Panorama Council Journal, Volume 3’s Cover

Lecture at the 24th IPC International Panorama Conference: “Cultural Heritage Through the Lens of the Panorama: Painted and Digital Panoramic Re-Presentations of Versailles”

Recently, I presented my paper entitled,”Cultural Heritage Through the Lens of the Panorama: Painted and Digital Panoramic Re-Presentations of Versailles” at the 24th IPC International Panorama Conference in Namur, Belgium, September 9-12, 2015.

Below is the paper’s abstract:

Since the advent of the painted panorama in the late 18th century, one of the goals for many panorama artists has been to faithfully depict the cultural landscape. The themes for the panorama have ranged from re-presenting locations such as Versailles, Salzburg and The Hague to events such as the Battle of Gettysburg. With the advent of computer technology and comprehensive data capture such as vr panoramic photography, video and scanning technologies, the notion of the panorama offers renewed opportunities in the re-presentation, preservation and dissemination of cultural heritage. For example, Google’s World Wonders Project, which was launched in 2012, is a platform to showcase world heritage sites. Utilizing Google technologies such as Street View, which provides street level panoramic views along various paths to simulate the notion of exploring a place, the World Wonders Project offers an alternative experience of visiting world heritage sites from the ancient temples of Kyoto to Pompeii. By comparing and contrasting two panoramic projects of Versailles, one being a painted panorama by John Vanderlyn completed in 1819 and the other, which is part of Google’s World Wonders Project, this paper will attempt to address such questions as: What is the purpose of heritage and how is it used? Is the re-presentation of heritage different in the digital versus the painted panorama? Has the notion of depicting cultural heritage changed since the 19th century? The paper will conclude with practical, useful recommendations to inform current and future initiatives in developing panoramic imaging projects for the preservation and dissemination of cultural heritage.

If you would like to download the conference program, please go to:
http://panoramacouncil.org/pics/files/documents/2015_Namur_program.pdf

If you would like to download the conference abstracts and speakers’ biographies, please go to:
http://panoramacouncil.org/pics/files/documents/2015_Namur_Abstracts_and_biographies_speakers.pdf

Conference paper will be posted at a later date.

Keywords: Painted Panorama, Cultural Heritage, Versailles, John Vanderlyn, Google’s World Wonders Project