Panorama of the Sanctuary at the Saint Mary–Saint Catherine of Siena Parish in Charlestown, Massachusetts

Saint Mary–Saint Catherine of Siena Parish in Charlestown, Massachusetts is a new addition to the Sacred Spaces of New England project. In 2006, the Saint Catherine of Siena parish joined nearby Saint Mary’s Church to form what is now known as Saint Mary–Saint Catherine of Siena Parish. Together they reside in the building that has housed the oldest Roman Catholic parish in Boston since its dedication in 1888, formerly known as Saint Mary’s Church.

If you would like to learn more about the parish, please visit Saint Mary–Saint Catherine of Siena Parish’s entry on the Sacred Spaces of New England website.

Seth Thompson Named Featured Researcher on the American University of Sharjah Website

On November 26, 2017, the library at the American University of Sharjah featured my research agenda. Please find below a link to the webpage:

http://library.aus.edu/2017/11/26/featured-researcher-seth-thompson-caad/

It was an honor to be chosen and I am thankful that my research is being considered as “influential and cutting-edge work”.

Panorama of the Sanctuary at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church in Newcastle, Maine

St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church in Newcastle, Maine is a new addition to the Sacred Spaces of New England project. Dedicated in 1883, St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church is the first example of a cottage Gothic Revival style church in the United States. Designed by architect Henry Vaughan, the wood framed building is protected by a wooden shingle gabled roof and its exterior walls finished with half-timbered stucco, reminiscent of 15th century English architecture.

If you would like to learn more about the church, please visit St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church’s entry on the Sacred Spaces of New England website.

The Episcopal Church of Saint John Baptist, Thomaston, Maine

 

 

The perseverance of the Episcopal Church of Saint John Baptist is mirrored by the resilience of its austere 1868 Carpenter Gothic style structure. Despite falling into disrepair in the 1950s and encountering financial hardships, its parishioners mended the building in the 1960s, exemplifying the church’s ability to weather adversity and return to its original splendor.